I did not have sex with that woman?

we were victims of the knife cutting he went into my soul. He took my arm, cut it and I don't know how it happened but we were destiny. She said he said they can't speak shut up and fuck me.
We were their pleasure- him

me his knief cutting in deeply

His self went into

My body

All the way

in

He took my arm,

cut it and I don’t know

how it happened

I don’t know

but

we were destiny.

She said

he said

they can’t speak

shut up

Fuck me

save me

Kill me

That’s

creativity

dr3

he knows how to three

mix it up when it’s hard

pulling the strip back

watching

it drips

holding on

licking the redness

he could kill it

softly

he’s a tough

man

 

he is all seeing Oedipus fulfilling the oracle

Kavka’s original version of the puzzle is the following:

An eccentric billionaire places before you a vial of toxin that, if you drink it, will make you painfully ill for a day, but will not threaten your life or have any lasting effects. The billionaire will pay you one million dollars tomorrow morning if, at midnight tonight, you intend to drink the toxin tomorrow afternoon. He emphasizes that you need not drink the toxin to receive the money; in fact, the money will already be in your bank account hours before the time for drinking it arrives, if you succeed. All you have to do. . . intend at midnight tonight to drink the stuff tomorrow afternoon. You are perfectly free to change your mind after receiving the money and not drink the toxin.[1]

A possible interpretation: Can you intend to drink the toxin if you also intend to change your mind at a later time?

  • In line with Newcomb’s paradox, an omniscient pay-off mechanism makes a person’s decision known to him before he makes the decision, but it is also assumed that the person may change his decision afterwards, of free will.
  • Similarly in line with Newcomb’s paradox; Kavka’s claim, that one cannot intend what one will not do, makes pay-off mechanism an example of reverse causation.
  • Pay-off for decision to drink the poison is ambiguous.
  • There are two decisions for one event with different pay-offs.

Since the pain caused by the poison would be more than off-set by the money received, we can sketch the pay-off table as follows.

anterior disintegrates

porphyrion

PORPHYRION was the King of the Gigantes who was struck down by Herakles and Zeus with arrows and lighning bolt when he attempted to rape the goddessHera during the Giant War.

He is probably the same as Eurymedon, who is named King of the Gigantes by Homer.

There are several possible etymologies for his name. It might derive from the word porphyreôs, “the surging,” referring to both the surges of the battlefield and of the sea. Another similar word porphyrô means “gleaming darkly.” The comedian Aristophanes in his play the Birds connects Porphyrion and his brother Alkyoneus with two birds, the purple-coot (Greek porphyriôn) and the halcyon (alkyôn).

swift and sweet falling a puddle

a mess a glissade on the cold ice white tiled floor

blooded gloves pulling at the cri de coeur

Epistemic filled eyes sigh

In the sighlence

Another

For

The

Wasteland

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